Menu Close

Session 510: Digital History and Digital Collections (aka, a fan letter for Roy and Dan)

There were lots of interesting ideas in the talks given by Dan Cohen and Roy Rosenzweig during their SAA session Archives Seminar: Possibilities and Problems of Digital History and Digital Collections (session 510).

Two big ideas were discussed: the first about historians and their relationship to internet archiving and the second about using the internet to create collections around significant events. These are not the same thing. ... 

Overall Conference Impressions

I went to many sessions at the 2006 Joint Annual Meeting of NAGARA, COSA, and SAA and will add more presentation posts over the course of the next two weeks. I have 37 pages of notes in MS Word – though there is lots of white space throughout as I made bullet lists and started new pages for new presentations as I went. And some of my notes are on paper (darn that laptop battery). My first three pages of notes translated into the 3 posts I have put up so far summarizing and commenting on sessions – so I suspect it will take me a while to work my way through them. Combine that with all the ideas generated in conversations with fabulous people or that occurred to me during presentations and I have no fear about running out of ideas for posts here anytime soon. ... 

SAA 2006 Session 103: “X” Marks the Spot: Archiving GIS Databases – Part III

With the famous Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy quote of “Don’t Panic!”, James Henderson of the Maine State Archives gave an overview of how they have approached archiving GIS data in his presentation “Managing GIS in the Digital Archives” (the third presentation of the ‘X Marks the Spot’ panel). His basic point is that there is no time to wait for the perfect alignment of resources and research – GIS data is being lost every day, so they had to do what they could as soon as possible to stop the loss. ... 

SAA 2006 Session 103: “X” Marks the Spot: Archiving GIS Databases – Part II

Richard Marciano of the SALT interdisciplinary lab (Sustainable Archives & Library Technologies) at the San Diego Supercomputer Center delivered a presentation titled “Research Issues Related to Preservation of Geospatial Electronic Records” – the 2nd topic in the ‘X’ Marks the Spot session.

He focuses on research Issues related to preservation of geospatial electronic records. While not an archivist, he is a member of SAA. As a person coming to archival studies with a strong background in software development, I took great comfort in his discussion of their being a great future for IT and archivists to work together on topics such as this. ... 

SAA 2006 Session 103: “X” Marks the Spot: Archiving GIS Databases – Part I

‘X’ Marks the Spot was a fantastic first session for me at the SAA conference. I have had a facination with GIS (Geographic Information Systems) for a long time. I love the layers of information. I love the fact that you can represent information in a way that often makes you realize new things just from seeing it on a map.

Since my write-ups of each panelist is fairly long, I will put each in a separate post. ... 

SAA2006: Joint Annual Meeting of NAGARA, COSA, and SAA

I will have my laptop with me at the SAA meeting in downtown DC later this week. My plan is to write my thoughts on my laptop as I go through the sessions over the course of the day and then post in the evenings after I get back home to the land of internet access.

I also will be sitting next to my Poster on Friday morning from 9-10am. If you want to stop by and say hello, that will be the easiest time and place to find me. My poster’s title is “Communicating Context in Online Collections” and I plan to upload a version of it to a page of this blog after the conference is over (along with links to all my sources). ... 

Thoughts on Archiving Web Sites

Shortly after my last post, a thread surfaced on the Archives Listserv asking the best way to crawl and record the top few layers of a website. This led to many posts suggesting all sorts of software geared toward this purpose. This post shares some of my thinking on the subject.

Adobe Acrobat can capture a website and convert it into a PDF. As pointed out in the thread above, that would loose the original source HTML – yet there are more issues than that alone. It would also loose any interaction other than links to other pages. It is not clear to me what would happen to a video or flash interface on a site being ‘captured’ by Acrobat. Quoting a lesson for Acrobat7 titled Working with the Web : “Acrobat can download HTML pages, JPEG, PNG, SWF, and GIF graphics (including the last frame of animated GIFs), text files, image maps and form fields. HTML pages can include tables, linkes, frames, background colors, text colors, and forms. Cascading Stylesheets are supported. HTML links are turned into Web links, and HTML forms are turned into PDF forms.” ... 

Paper Calendars, Palm Pilots and Google Calendar

In my intro archives class (LBSC 605 Archival Principles, Practices, and Programs), one of the first ideas that made a light bulb go on over my head related to the theory that archivists want to retain the original order of records. For example, if someone choose to put a series of 10 letters together in a file – then they should be kept that way. A researcher may be able to glean more information from these letters when he/she sees them grouped that way – organized as the person who originally used them organized them. ... 

Introduction

My name is Jeanne. I am a graduate student in an Archives program pursuing my MLS (aka, Master of Library Science). I have enjoyed all my classes to date (3) and I love the ideas that those classes have generated. Sometimes I leave class with just as many personal ideas scrawled in the margins of my notebook as class notes written on the main page. I am especially intrigued by the ways in which concepts from different fields intersect. How do ideas from my current field of software development and database design illuminate new issues, questions and concepts in the realm of archival studies? ...